Vuyani Jarana joins Mobax as shareholder and chair

Article by: Fin24
8 April 2020

Vuyani Jarana Mobax Group Chairman

A concerted effort must be made to localise appropriate portions of the ICT industry spend within the African continent, according to Vuyani Jarana, shareholder and newly appointed chair of Mobax.

The of large-scale ICT infrastructure and services company announced on Wednesday that Jarana’aim will be to reach this goal.

Mobax wants to become a major role player in the movement towards addressing South Africa’s challenges when it comes to the telecommunications industry.

It believes that Jarana will bring strong industry experience to the table, having spent years in strategic C-level positions at Vodacom (including as COO) and SAA (as group CEO).

According to Jarana, the ICT sector input costs across the continent are largely import driven, leading to significant capital outflows to countries with patents to produce technology.

As the demand for data services increases across the continent, there is, in his view, a need for telecommunications companies to invest in both fixed and mobile infrastructure if they are to meet the demands of digitising nation economies. “What is important for Mobax is how, in taking advantage of these developments, it brings other small and medium enterprises to partner in its infrastructure build programme, thus widening participation in the industry growth. This is my expectation of the new Mobax, creating ecosystems of value for all,” Jarana says in a statement.

“Jump-starting economies post-corona is what economic planners and experts are seized with across the world. Two industries that continue to grow during corona and will continue even post-corona is agriculture and the ICT sector, driven by demand for food and broadband respectively.”

In his view, access to the capabilities of a company like Mobax will not only ensure speed of rollout and quality of service but should be able to aggregate the overall industry infrastructure economics to unlock true value to participating telecommunication clients. According to Jarana major challenges in the industry on the continent range from spectrum constraints, increased price regulatory pressures, unstable grid electricity exacerbated by infrastructure vandalism and theft.

That is why telecommunications companies must innovate not only in terms of diversifying their revenue streams, but must also innovate on the operating and capex cost side in deploying and maintaining the underlying infrastructure.

“We will continue to partner with telecommunication companies to help them rollout infrastructure to meet the needs of their customers,” says Jarana. “Our solution is largely green energy biased, thus giving the telecommunications companies a ‘hat-trick’ of benefits: network availability, carbon footprint reduction as well as long-term opex cost predictability,” says Jarana. He is excited about the challenge of developing a platform that will allow SMMEs to become major role players in the ICT sector’s further development and the overall economy.